Vaccine Information

 

Just like people, ALL dogs and cats need vaccines in order to stay healthy. Here is some helpful information:

 

PUPPY VACCINES

Contrary to popular belief, there is no set number of vaccines that should be given to puppies. They MUST receive vaccines at regular intervals until they are 16-20 weeks of age. This is because the vaccine will only work once protective antibodies that are given to the puppy from its mom are gone. You have to give multiple vaccines because there is no way to predict at exactly what age  this will happen, but it will happen sometime between 6 weeks and 20 weeks of age. By giving vaccines every 3-4 weeks, you guarantee your puppy is protected once those antibodies wear off.

 

SCHEDULE

DA2PPv (parvo/distemper): Beginning at 6 weeks and 1.5 pounds, EVERY 3-4 WEEKS with the last one being given on or after 16 weeks of age, then every year.

Bordetella (kennel cough): Any time after 8 weeks of age and boostered every year.

Rabies: Given any time after 12 weeks of age. Pets that receive their first rabies vaccine should be re-vaccinated one year later, then vaccinated every three years.

 

KITTEN VACCINES

Kittens need vaccines too, and have a similar schedule to puppies.

 

SCHEDULE

FVRCP (upper respiratory): Beginning at least 9 weeks and 2.3 pounds, and should receive two vaccines, 3-4 weeks apart, then every year.

FeLV (feline leukemia): See FVRCP.  It is highly recommended that cats be tested for feline leukemia before receiving the vaccine.

Rabies: Given any time after 12 weeks of age. Pets that receive their first rabies vaccine should be re-vaccinated one year later, then vaccinated every three years.

 

What diseases do these vaccines prevent?

 

What Does DA2PP Stand For?


Dogs are susceptible to many contagious diseases, most of which are caused by viruses. Fortunately, we have vaccines to prevent our canine friends from succumbing to several of the worst ones. A series of DA2PP injections (three weeks apart) is given to puppies. The vaccine series is usually started at six to eight weeks of age. It is then given as an annual booster for the remainder of the dog’s life. There are four preventive agents in the DA2PP vaccine. The following is an explanation of each of those agents.

 

D Stands For Canine Distemper Virus
Distemper is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic dogs and other animals such as ferrets, skunks and raccoons. It is an incurable, often fatal, multisystemic disease that affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Distemper is caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV).

A2 Stands For Adenovirus type-2
P Stands For Parainfluenza Virus
Several viruses and bacteria can cause kennel cough, often at the same time. These include adenovirus type-2 (distinct from the adenovirus type 1 that causes infectious hepatitis), parainfluenza virus, and the bacterium Bordetella bronchiseptica. Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the name "kennel cough."

Clinical signs may be variable. It is often a mild disease, but the cough may be chronic, lasting for several weeks in some cases. Common clinical signs include a loud cough often describe as a "goose honk", runny eyes and nose, swollen tonsils, wheezing, lack of appetite and depressed behavior.Most dogs with infectious tracheobronchitis will cough when the throat is rubbed or palpated. Often, the hacking cough caused by kennel cough will persist for several weeks after the infection.There is no specific treatment for the viral infections, but many of the more severe signs are due to bacterial involvement, particularly Bordetella bronchiseptica. Antibiotics are useful against this bacterium.Some cases require prolonged treatment, but most infections resolve within one to three weeks. Mild clinical signs may linger for several weeks even when the bacteria have been eliminated. Cough suppressants and anti-inflammatory medications may provide relief in some cases.

P Stands For Parvovirus
Parvo is a highly contagious disease characterized by a short course and high mortality rate. The disease is caused by a virus similar to the parvovirus seen in cats. It is very resistant and may remain infectious in the environment for up to a year.

The first symptom is loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. The diarrhea often has a very strong smell, may contain lots of mucus and may or may not contain blood. Additionally, affected dogs often exhibit marked listlessness, depression, and fever.

Parvo may affect dogs of all ages, but is most common in unvaccinated dogs less than one year of age. Young puppies less than five months of age are usually the most severely affected, and the most difficult to treat. Infected dogs usually must be hospitalized with intensive treatment such as intravenous fluids, antibiotic and supportive care.

 

What is Bordetella?

 

Bordetellosis is a bacterial disease of dogs involved in causing “Kennel cough.” Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the name "kennel cough."

Clinical signs may be variable. It is often a mild disease, but the cough may be chronic, lasting for several weeks in some cases. Common clinical signs include a loud cough often describe as a "goose honk", runny eyes and nose, swollen tonsils, wheezing, lack of appetite and depressed behavior.Most dogs with infectious tracheobronchitis will cough when the throat is rubbed or palpated. Often, the hacking cough caused by kennel cough will persist for several weeks after the infection.

 

What does FVRCP stand for?

 

Cats are susceptible to many contagious diseases, most of which are caused by viruses. Fortunately, we have vaccines to prevent our feline friends from succumbing to several of the worst ones. A series of four FVRCP injections (three weeks apart) is given to kittens. The vaccine series is usually started at six to eight weeks of age. It is then given as an annual booster for the remainder of the cat's life. There are three preventive agents in the FVRCP vaccine. The following is an explanation of each of those agents.

 

FVR Stands For Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis

Rhinotracheitis is a severe upper respiratory infection caused by a feline type 1, herpes-virus. It is most severe in young kittens and older cats, and is one of the most serious upper respiratory diseases seen in the feline species. The virus is airborne and very contagious in susceptible animals. Cats with this infection are lethargic, and show signs of respiratory involvement with much sneezing and coughing. There is usually a discharge from the nostrils and the eyes, and a high temperature may be present. Some cats develop pneumonia and occasionally ulcerations in the eyes. Infested cats do not want to eat or drink because the nostrils are plugged and the throat is sore. Dehydration and weight loss are common.

The disease is debilitating and chronic. Many cats require hospitalization, intravenous fluids and intensive care to help them get over the infection. Antibiotics are given to treat secondary bacterial infections. Some cats suffer permanent damage to the eyes and the respiratory system. Fortunately, the vaccine is an effective preventive agent.

C Stands For Calicivirus Infection

There are several strains of caliciviruses that affect the cat. They can cause a range of diseases, from a mild almost asymptomatic infection, to life-threatening pneumonia. Most cases show only evidence of problems in the mouth, nasal passages and the conjunctiva (mucus membranes) of the eyes.

Early signs are loss of appetite, elevated temperature and lethargy. Later, sneezing, oral ulcers and discharge from the eyes are seen. The course of the disease in uncomplicated cases is short, and recovery may be expected in seven to ten days. Some of the more virulent strains can cause severe symptoms. They may cause rapid death in young kittens and older cats.

The disease is transmitted by direct contact with an infected cat or object (bowl, cage, brush, blanket, etc.) that harbors the virus. The virus can survive eight to ten days in the environment. Carrier cats can pass the virus into the environment for up to one year.

P Stands For Panleukopenia

Panleukopenia (also known as feline distemper and infectious feline enteritis) is a highly contagious disease characterized by a short course and high mortality rate. The disease is caused by a parvovirus similar to the parvovirus seen in dogs. It is very resistant and may remain infectious in the environment for up to a year.

The disease is most severe in young kittens, but can affect cats of all ages. The first symptom is loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. A blood count usually shows a lowered number of white blood cells, a fact which helps in diagnosing the infection. Infected cats usually must be hospitalized with intensive treatment such as intravenous fluids, antibiotic and supportive care. Mortality rate may reach 90% in young kittens under six months, and may approach 50% in older animals. The vaccine is very effective in preventing the disease.

 

RESCUES/SHELTERS- click here for instructions

© 2014 by H.O.P.E. Animal Foundation: Proudly created with Wix.com